Saskatoon Health Region
Demographics

Updated January 2017

 

Population Projections

About the Data One Page Summary

First Nations and Métis Population

About the Data

One Page Summary

Definition:

“Aboriginal identity” refers to whether a person reported being an Aboriginal person, that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, or Inuk (Inuit) and/or being a Registered or Treaty Indian (that is, registered under the Indian Act of Canada) and/or being a member of a First Nation or Indian band.

Calculation:

Percent of population that identifies as Aboriginal = Aboriginal identity population divided by total population in private households.

Sub-group of Aboriginal Identity population = Métis single identity population divided by total Aboriginal identity population.

Note that this same calculation is done for First Nations and Other categories (i.e. Inuit, multiple Aboriginal and Aboriginal not included elsewhere).

Source:

Statistics Canada, National Household Survey 2011.

Limitations:

National Household Survey (NHS) 2011 is voluntary and is subject to a higher non-response rate than previous census. Based on information from other data sources, evidence of non-response bias does exist for certain populations and for certain geographic areas.

Some Indian reserves and settlements did not participate in the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as enumeration was either not permitted, it was interrupted before completion, or because of natural events (e.g., forest fires). These reserves are referred to as 'incompletely enumerated reserves.' There were 36 reserves out of 863 inhabited reserves in the 2011 NHS that were incompletely enumerated.

References:

Statistics Canada. Aboriginal peoples in Canada: First Nations people, Métis and Inuit. National Household Survey, 2011. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2013.

Geographies:

Often the most reported geography is for those people living within Saskatoon Health Region boundaries. However, in some cases, those living in Saskatoon and rural areas of the Health Region are also reported. Saskatoon means those people living within city of Saskatoon boundaries. ‘Rural Saskatoon Health Region’ reflects those living within the health region boundaries, but outside city of Saskatoon boundaries. Saskatchewan and Canada are also used as comparators depending on data availability.

Newcomer Population

About the Data

One Page Summary

Definition:

In this analysis, the term Newcomer is used which is also referred to as ‘Immigrant’ by Statistics Canada Census and National Household Survey’s. Immigrant is a person who is or has ever been a landed immigrant/permanent resident. This person has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada a number of years while others have arrived recently (see Recent Newcomers below). Immigrant excludes non-permanent residents, which are persons from another country who have a work or study permit or who are refugee claimants, and any non-Canadian born family member living in Canada with them.

Recent Newcomer in this analysis is an immigrant who arrived recently (i.e. within the past five years). Newcomer in 2011 is someone who landed in Canada between Jan 1, 2006 and May 10, 2011. Newcomer in 2006 was someone who landed in Canada between Jan 1, 2001 and May 10, 2006.

Calculation:

Percent newcomer population = immigrant population divided by total population in private households.

Recent newcomer population = total recent immigrant population in private households in 2006 and 2011.

Source:

Statistics Canada, National Household Survey 2011. Statistics Canada Census 2006.

Limitations:

National Household Survey (NHS) 2011 is voluntary and is subject to a higher non-response rate than previous census. Based on information from other data sources, evidence of non-response bias does exist for certain populations and for certain geographic areas. Comparisons between 2011NHS and 2006 Census should be done with caution.

Reference:

Statistics Canada. Immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. National Household Survey, 2011. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2013.

Geographies:

Often the most reported geography is for those people living within Saskatoon Health Region boundaries. However, in some cases, those living in Saskatoon and rural areas of the Health Region are also reported. Saskatoon means those people living within city of Saskatoon boundaries. ‘Rural Saskatoon Health Region’ reflects those living within the health region boundaries, but outside city of Saskatoon boundaries. Saskatchewan and Canada are also used as comparators depending on data availability.

Language

About the Data

One Page Summary

Definition:

The percentage of the population that reports their mother tongue, which is first language learned as a child and still known by respondent at time of census.

Calculation:

Percent language spoken = English single response population divided by total population excluding institutional residents.

This same calculation is used for French single response, multiple response and Other languages.

Percent language spoken of non-official languages = Germanic population divided by population speaking Other languages.

This same calculation is done for other language families.

Source:

Statistics Canada, Census, 2011.

Limitations:

National Household Survey (NHS) 2011 is voluntary and is subject to a higher non-response rate than previous census. Based on information from other data sources, evidence of non-response bias does exist for certain populations and for certain geographic areas.

Statistics Canada has observed changes in patterns of response to both the mother tongue and home language questions that appear to have arisen from changes in the placement and context of the language questions on the 2011 Census questionnaire relative to previous censuses. As a result, Canadians appear to have been less inclined than in previous censuses to report languages other than English or French as their only mother tongue, and also more inclined to report multiple languages as their mother tongue and as the language used most often at home.

References:

Bowen S. Language barriers in access to health care. Health Canada 2001 [cited 2014 Mar 4]; Available from: URL: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/alt_formats/hpb-dgps/pdf/pubs/2001-lang-acces/2001-lang-acces-eng.pdf

Saskatoon Health Region. Saskatoon Health Region policy number 7311-20-013. Interpretation and translation services. Saskatoon Health Region 2013 [cited 2014 Mar 3]; Available from: URL: http://www.saskatoonhealthregion.ca/about_us/policies/7311-20-013.pdf

Statistics Canada. Immigrant languages in Canada. Language, 2011 Census of population. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2012.

Geographies:

Often the most reported geography is for those people living within Saskatoon Health Region boundaries. However, in some cases, those living in Saskatoon and rural areas of the Health Region are also reported. Saskatoon means those people living within city of Saskatoon boundaries. ‘Rural Saskatoon Health Region’ reflects those living within the health region boundaries, but outside city of Saskatoon boundaries. Saskatchewan and Canada are also used as comparators depending on data availability.